Sunday, May 4, 2014

心臓と腎臓によるメタボリックは、最近の高齢化に伴い心血管症で、より重要視されるようになってきた

心臓と腎臓によるメタボリックは、最近の高齢化に伴い心血管症で、より重要視されるようになってきた Cardiometabolic Disease: An Unprecedented Opportunity For an Interdisciplinary Approach to CV Care Posted on May 1, 2014 by Michael Mansour Cardiometabolic disease is a serious and growing public health problem made up of an increasingly complex constellation of diseases that physicians must navigate. Cardiometabolic risk factors can entail everything from metabolic syndromes such as dyslipidemia, hypertension, obesity, insulin resistance and hyperglycemia, to behavioral factors such as physical inactivity, smoking and unhealthy diet, and even more genetic causes such as family history, age and gender. Cardiorenal metabolic syndromes, including microalbuminuria and reduced renal function, have recently been adopted into this greater defined sphere. Ethnic/minority populations are at particular risk, according to a comprehensive review published in Cardiorenal Medicine1. The review addresses cardiorenal metabolic syndrome and cardiometabolic risks in minority populations, noting that both are significant sources of morbidity and mortality in racial/ethnic minorities, as well as health care costs. “Recent dramatic improvements in life expectancy and health care have not occurred equitably, and disparities in quality care, morbidity, and mortality between whites and certain racial/ethnic minorities, including the white-black mortality gap, persist,” according to the authors. It also provides recommendations on ways to better control these factors and effectively reduce cardiovascular disease in diverse populations and provide more coordinated care. Caring for patients across the spectrum of cardiometabolic risk requires an integrated, coordinated and interdisciplinary approach to patient care that is largely unprecedented, and as such the groups recommend use of the National Minority Quality Forum’s Disease-Based Index and Cardiometabolic Index, better tools and resources for patient-centered care and self-management, more aggressive advocacy against obesity, and more comprehensive treatment programs for cardiometabolic risk. “The costs of cardiovascular disease and cardiorenal metabolic syndrome disparities are tremendous and must be addressed through culturally appropriate lifestyle modification, therapeutic programs and public health initiatives,” the authors also note. Cardiometabolic Disease: An Unprecedented Opportunity For an Interdisciplinary Approach to CV Care Posted on May 1, 2014 by Michael Mansour Cardiometabolic disease is a serious and growing public health problem made up of an increasingly complex constellation of diseases that physicians must navigate. Cardiometabolic risk factors can entail everything from metabolic syndromes such as dyslipidemia, hypertension, obesity, insulin resistance and hyperglycemia, to behavioral factors such as physical inactivity, smoking and unhealthy diet, and even more genetic causes such as family history, age and gender. Cardiorenal metabolic syndromes, including microalbuminuria and reduced renal function, have recently been adopted into this greater defined sphere. Ethnic/minority populations are at particular risk, according to a comprehensive review published in Cardiorenal Medicine1. The review addresses cardiorenal metabolic syndrome and cardiometabolic risks in minority populations, noting that both are significant sources of morbidity and mortality in racial/ethnic minorities, as well as health care costs. “Recent dramatic improvements in life expectancy and health care have not occurred equitably, and disparities in quality care, morbidity, and mortality between whites and certain racial/ethnic minorities, including the white-black mortality gap, persist,” according to the authors. It also provides recommendations on ways to better control these factors and effectively reduce cardiovascular disease in diverse populations and provide more coordinated care. Caring for patients across the spectrum of cardiometabolic risk requires an integrated, coordinated and interdisciplinary approach to patient care that is largely unprecedented, and as such the groups recommend use of the National Minority Quality Forum’s Disease-Based Index and Cardiometabolic Index, better tools and resources for patient-centered care and self-management, more aggressive advocacy against obesity, and more comprehensive treatment programs for cardiometabolic risk. “The costs of cardiovascular disease and cardiorenal metabolic syndrome disparities are tremendous and must be addressed through culturally appropriate lifestyle modification, therapeutic programs and public health initiatives,” the authors also note.

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